LinkedIn and Your Content Strategy

LinkedIn and Your Content Strategy

In our last post, we talked about opportunities to maximize the investment you made in the content you created by extending its reach through various distribution channels. For examples, a blog post can be converted into a video or a whitepaper into a series of infographics.

Just 2 days after writing this post, we discovered a new feature on LinkedIn that allows you to share your powerpoint presentations, white papers, ebooks, and other publications (like custom magazines) in PDF, Word, or PowerPoint format.

We made the discovery after a client posted one of our HR Insights publications on their company page. We honestly felt like we were living under a rock and should have already known about the new feature. However, after sharing the information and their post on LinkedIn, we quickly realized (based on comments) we were not the only one who felt this way.


Reuse and Recycle Your Marketing Content

Reuse and Recycle Your Marketing Content

But definitely, don’t reduce :)

No company can exist without people who are willing to pay for its products or services. But people need to be aware of—and have positive feelings about—a company before they will choose to give it their business. That’s why a critical part of any organization’s operating budget covers marketing and public relations.

For decades, print ads (handbills, newspaper notices, posters, billboard, etc.) were the primary venue for this outreach. Eventually they were joined by radio spots and then television commercials. And in recent years, digital advertising has become a major player on the marketing scene—as you no doubt already know if you’ve ever faced an inbox full of spam viewed a website teeming with banner ads and embedded videos. All of these kinds of media vary in many ways, but they all have one thing in common: they cost money to produce.

The hefty financial investment needed to produce marketing materials and the ever-increasing options for distributing them mean that more and more companies are looking for ways to get the most bang for their buck.

Making Career Development a Habit

Making Career Development a Habit

For too long, career development has been treated as an event – something that happens episodically, generally on an annual basis. It’s a formal line in the sand and opportunity to connect and contract around how to help others grow. It has tended to be highly regulated and dictated, with a focus on the paperwork and processes instead of the person on the other side of the desk.

Imagine if you exercised only once each year. Or meditated annually rather than daily. Positive habits could never be built. And because the same holds true for career development, many leaders are missing an opportunity to powerfully help people (and their organizations) grow.

Authentic, sustainable, engaging development isn’t a one-and-done yearly event. It’s a daily habit of effective leaders.

Ten Habits the Top Members of Your Sales Team Have

Ten Habits the Top Members of Your Sales Team Have

Take a look at your top sales performers and I bet you'll see that they all check at least 9 of these boxes! Selling a company’s products or services is not rocket science (unless you’re selling some sort of rocket propulsion technology). However, for a member of your sales team to be successful they need to have the right personality traits. Some of the habits are innate but all can be taught. Investing the time to select the right members of your team will pay high dividends.

Review: Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go

Review: Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go

What was your last career-planning conversation like?

Mine took place a long time ago, when I was a cog in the wheel of corporate America. My then-manager and I talked about how I saw myself advancing within the company and what I needed to do to achieve my goals there. The conversation energized me, and that evening I went home with renewed enthusiasm for my job and for my role in the organization. A week or so later, though, my enthusiasm faded as I found myself remembering that I’d had similar conversations with my manager before—and nothing had really changed. (And that’s why, the following year, I left that company and started Mamu Media.)

All of my memories of wasted time and energy caused by a manager who was merely going through the motions came flooding back to me when I recently read Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go: Career Conversations Organizations Need and Employees Want, by Beverly Kaye and Julie Winkle Giulioni.